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Friday, March 31, 2017

Wander Reading #29

Posted by Tim Stobbs on September 24, 2010

Welcome to my wander reading post which occurs every second week to summarize some of the interesting reading I found on the internet.  I hope you find something useful or at the very least entertaining in these links.

So Robert, one of the writers on this blog, pointed out to me that we are slowly closing in on our 1000 post on this blog.  We should hit that milestone in about a month from now, since that will occur right around this blog’s 4th birthday I will likely combine both events into a contest.  I’m still working out the timing and prize(s), but stay tuned for that.

Preet wonders who is more believable: Buffet or Gekko?

In case you missed it, you will be getting a CPP cheque. It’s amazing how much money you can make with $130 billion invested.

Trent from the Simple Dollar gives a list of 13 books worth reading.  Damn, now I have more books to get from the library.

Some advice on a rich-enough retirement.  I don’t agree with all of it, but it does bring up a few good points like what is IDD?

The Financial Blogger asks which jobs would you choose if you were an millionaire?  I would have to say writer/author and politician, which I’m actually doing both now to some degree.  I would just do more of it.

Brip Blap wonders if he should take a pay cut?  I did recently and I have no regrets.  It’s all about what you want from your life.

JD Roth made me laugh out loud with the opening of this post.  Then he goes onto an interesting point about shopping for things after you have purged your stuff.

Canadian Capitalist points out the every savings are often exaggerated.   Which is partly from it’s hard to apply rough numbers of energy usage since people’s consumption patterns can vary by a lot.  I personally like this calculator from our power provider which allows you to get a very good estimate of savings if you play with the settings a bit. If you are from another area just ignore the dollar value at the end and use the kWh total and your local power rate to find your savings.

Have a good weekend,

Tim

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