subscribe to the RSS Feed

Monday, June 27, 2016

Books, Reviews and Reading Lists

Posted by Tim Stobbs on March 15, 2016

I love books, like A LOT.  Like to the point the librarians at our local library branch know me by first and last name, which isn’t surprising when we go there almost every week of the year.  As some of you may recall I even used to post the odd book review here on relevant titles, but I’ve more or less stopped that as I read too much and couldn’t keep up with what I finished reading. (For reference my reading goal for the year is 100 books, which isn’t really that much of stretch for me. I did say I read A LOT.)

Yet now I found the crack for book lovers website: aka Goodreads.  While I’m rather new to the site I’m slowly building up a listing of books I’ve read and like and will even put in the odd review for those that might be interested in following my reading tastes this is my profile.  Please be patient with me as building up what I’ve read over the years is a work in progress.   I do hope to offer you all an idea of what retirement books I found useful over the years plus a heavy dose of other business books, fantasy and science fiction and even some young adult books (yes I like Harry Potter and Percy Jackson).

So if somehow you are curious about what I’m reading in a given week I now am giving you all collective permission to stalk my reading habits.  Hopefully this will be more effect means for keeping you up to date on books that may help you out on your own journey to early retirement.

Overly Happy

Posted by Tim Stobbs on February 11, 2016

Given the amount I talk about happiness on this blog, you might assume I live a charmed life with a constant smile on my face but that isn’t true.  In fact, when you consider happiness from a evolutionary point of view being constantly stung out in a good mood would likely ensure your species didn’t survive.  After all without fear or worry, your offspring might be lunch for something else which is hardly productive to a species long term survival.

In reality, my life is fairly good most of the time, but it also has its ups and downs just like yours. For example, last year I had a bit of a down period of a few months where I was just utter disengaged from my work.  I didn’t care about my work at all and really didn’t want to be there.  Being in that frame of mind for too long started to eat into the rest of my life and the end result was obvious: I wasn’t that happy for a few months.  Not full on depressed, but definitely down.

Yet shouldn’t I be happy with my life?  Well people might consider my answer should be yes, but you also have to consider that  the constant pressure from everywhere to be happier and improve yourself.  This isn’t to say I don’t like some degree of self improvement, but with happiness our culture seem bloody well obsessed with it.  Don’t believe, do a Google search for ‘happy’…I got 2.4 billion results.  Or if you want to refine things a bit search “how to be happy” and you will get 639 million results.  Given the amount of research, books and other media on the topic we should all be walking around with a permanent smile on our faces. Yet we still aren’t happy all the time.

So what’s the problem? Well basically we can’t stop feeling the negative emotions in life.  We still feel fear, greed, envy, and yes even the dreaded sad emotion.  But that is actually a good thing. The fact of the matter is your negative emotions are there and they do serve a purpose.  You actually need them to help define the other positive emotions like happiness.  It’s like trying to define zero without the one in binary or vice versa.

We aren’t meant to be happy all the time, so it is okay to stop trying to feeling happy constantly.  It’s like we all got addicted to being happy and we all collectively on the constant search for a our next high from it.  Yet that kind of thinking can be dangerous to your long term well being.  For example, as you can start to overeat to feel better, watch too much TV to feel better and then over time feel bad that you got fat and don’t do anything in you life but work and watch TV.  Your quest for happiness ended up with you being unhappy because you didn’t consider the long term cost of being too happy.

In the end, you should adjust what you are doing in your life when you do get down for a period of time.  That is a healthy thing to try, but we shouldn’t be a constantly evolving trying to get just a few more minutes of each day of being happy.  Oh, I got 49 minutes of happiness at work today, that was better than 45 last week. That isn’t healthy, so my advice is find that point where you have enough happiness in your life.  That you generally feel fairly good about the world, but still have your bad days too and then stop trying to be happier. Life is meant to be lived, so don’t spend it overly trying to improve something that is already just fine the way it is.

So do you feel pressured to be happier in your life? If so, how do you deal with it?

Getting Everything You Want

Posted by Tim Stobbs on January 13, 2016

So over the holidays I was a bit shocked to realize I literally got just about everything on my wish list.  The only missing items were socks and a bottle of scotch (which no I didn’t go Boxing Day shopping for instead I waited to almost the new year to buy when the stores were less busy…oh its official my scotch is now as old as my career at 15 years *grin*). I think it helps that my wish list in the first place was small, but it did occur to me that despite getting just about everything I wanted I wasn’t suddenly like ten times happier.  In fact, things went on very similar to how they went on before over all for my happiness.  Within a week I wasn’t any much happier than when I got it all.

That of course is a minor example, but the same thing does end up applying to those that have sudden windfalls of money.  The lower amount you might easily miss it, but the effect does kick in regardless of how much you win (yes even the poor soul that will win the $1.5 billion dollar lotto in the US).  Because of one very simple little fact: money doesn’t change who you are.  In larger amounts it just more obvious to see your personality based on your spending.  So if before you have a windfall you can’t keep track of your spending and suck at understanding you taxes, then afterwards it will be the same.  Just you will buy bigger things and not keep track of them and get even more confused on your taxes.  The shift just may be more obvious with a sudden windfall of money.  Feel free to search out a few documentaries on this fact, they tend to be rather interesting to see how someone can blow through several million dollars in less than five years.

Saving to retire early is a very similar process, it just takes longer to have it happen and smaller amounts.  So before having a lot of savings, I tended to value quality items and not buy cheap things that break easily.  I also tended to keep things until they actually break or can no longer be used.  And now with over $400,000 in investments, I tend to buy things that last and avoid cheap crap that breaks easily. And despite it all I still tend to save money, even when I really don’t have to it.  For example, most of the time I don’t spend all my spending cash in a month.  Savings is a habit with me that I fully expect not to really break even when I don’t have to do it anymore. Why? Because something always comes up…good or bad and the cash is usually handy to have at that point.

This isn’t to say you never change, because saving for retirement has changed me. Just not my core values and beliefs in life.  Rather I just seem to become more of myself as I get older and have more saved.  I dislike kissing ass to people in charge and I even dislike it more when I’m in charge of something.  Now I just be honest with people and tend to push the edge of what would be socially acceptable when someone is trying to make themselves look good or be impressive.  I’m not mean about it, but I just won’t put up with it. Or the fact, I tend to judge people less for their spending choices now.  I get some people REALLY value that annual trip to Mexico, so if that is what they love so be it.  I just personally don’t have that much interest in it (or more precisely I don’t get going to the same location every time).  People just value different things and that is okay.

In the end, you can get everything you want in life and be happy or miserable because the money or things really don’t matter too much.  It’s what’s going on in your head that matters the most.  So yes, please save something for your retirement, but more importantly ask yourself what exactly you plan to do with it.  Start a business that you had in your head for years with no pressure of making a profit.  Or perhaps learning some skills you never had time for.  In short, you need a why…why am I doing this…without that it’s just a big old pile of money.