Cell Phone Shopping

I’ve been blessed or cursed depending with your point of view with a work issued cell phone now for the last several years which they allow me to also use as my personal cell.  This eliminated the need to carry two phones around and also meant I haven’t paid a personal cell phone bill in years.  After leaving  my current employer it was time to get a new personal cell phone.  Someone well timed my wife also needs an upgrade to hers as well.

It’s amazing to me that most people tend to go about getting a new cell phone with one simple question: do you prefer Android or Apple?  Well somewhat crude it does tend to start you down one path or the other.  In my case I’ve actually used both over the years and I have to admit I’m an Android fan.  Why?  Mainly because I like the greater degree of control that Android OS offers, but also the fact I personal feel the price of an Apple phone isn’t worth it for the features and performance it offers. After all a iPhone retails for over $900 each $1300 each for the newest model. My wife also agrees which makes this first decision easy: Android it is.

Now with that done the next question to address if what do you need your phone for?  For me and my wife that is mainly texting, with a not too many calls and not a lot of data usage. In addition, this is a bit more complicated because of two other reasons.  First since my old phone is used for work and personal it means I only have a rough idea of what I would use a personal phone for since the usage was all mixed together.  The second is we are planning on cancelling on landline soon and transferring those calls to my wife’s phone which means we aren’t entire sure what she is going to need for calls.  So in the end after looking around at various plans and providers we decided to go prepaid and skip a contract for the moment. After we get a better idea of our usage we might consider a contract in the future but for now we want to go as low cost as possible and some flexibility on usage.  In the end, I found a prepaid option with Koodo that has good network coverage in our province (my wife was previous with Rogers which coverage sucks for most rural locations near us so we removed them from the list of options) and also has a basic plan with unlimited texting (and texting photos) for $15/month per phone.  The bad news was that didn’t include any calling minutes or data, but with their prepaid plan you could buy boosters for talking minutes and data usage that don’t expire.  Thus we can buy some boosters to start with and see how we actually use our phones for over a while and then decide to shift to contract or other option in the future.  So in a word: flexibility.

So skipping the contract on a new phone then has the implication of we aren’t likely to get a phone for free or discounted.  So now we need to buy new phones out right for each of us.  I decided that my previously issued work iPhone 5s was fine so for my usage so I used that as a template for specs when looking for a new phones for us to buy.  I also decided early on I wanted to avoid Samsung as a manufacture for our new phones.  Why? Well that is because we have several Samsung tablets in our house for the last few years and it drives me a bit nuts that the customized android OS uses so much bloody memory.  I mean that thing has so much bloatware on it you end up spending more time managing memory issues than anything else.  So after looking around for options that will work with Koodo’s network we decided on the LG K4 2017 for both of us should meet our needs.  Then after shopping around I found them for $100 each over at Best Buy’s website (which was $20 less than Koodo’s site).  So with free shipping the new phones arrived at our house a few days later.  The bonus I wasn’t expecting with the phones were they already included SIM cards for Koodo so that saved us another $20 each and they offer when you active your phone you get a $20 credit on your account.  So adding that together we saved like $60 for each phone.  Nice way to start.

Then we setup the accounts online and picked out a boosters to start with which is where we learned we qualified for a few other goodies like an extra 100 anytime call minutes for registering a credit card to our account and when you sign up for auto payments your account get credited back 10%.  Then we added in some boosters to get us started.  I picked up 100 anytime call minutes and 1 GB of data to start, while my wife picked up 500 anytime call minutes and 1 GB data to start (keep in mind she is replacing our landline so we expect her to get more calls).  So all in we spent another $85 for our first month of texts and all the boosters.  After this our monthly cost will be $30/month for both phones (keeping in mind we get 10% of that back as a credit on the accounts).  This is actually close to our current costs as my wife’s text plan was only $5/month and we spend $20/month on the landline.

Now we just have to sit back and see how long our minutes and data take us to use up.  I’m guessing a fairly long while as we actually keep our data off entirely when we are at home.  Instead we use the existing WiFi in the house.  Even when I leave the house I actually keep the data off until I need it for something.  I personally don’t care to be notified when every email arrives or when someone ‘likes’ a post of mine on Facebook so it stays off most of the time (beside I disable most notifications on my phone anyway).

So that is our initial plan for our new cells phones for a total start up cost of just over $300 and around $30/month operating costs to start with.  Not too bad.

3 thoughts on “Cell Phone Shopping”

  1. I can’t imagine paying that much for either a new cell phone or for a monthly plan. I bought for my first cell phone a low-end Tracfone in early 2015 for $20 and it is on a pay-per-minute plan. I buy new minutes once or twice a year and spend on average about $6 a month. I use it very rarely and, sadly, most of its use is from all the garbage robocallers and scammers who call me on it even though I have given the number out to maybe 10 people.

  2. @ Steve and deegee – Yep, that is one of the downsides of Canada…really expensive cell phone and plans. Don’t even get me started on the cost of cell plans for any of the big telecom providers. I looked and got disgusted really fast. Oh, I suppose the good news is you can own stock in those companies and just collective the dividends to offset the cost. 😉

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