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Thursday, March 30, 2017

A History of Labour – Part IV

Posted by Tim Stobbs on February 27, 2015

UnemploymentWelcome to the Wasteland (Year 2 AD – After Degree)

Overall in my life I don’t actually regret much.  I’m fairly happy with where I am and what I’m doing but I have to look back at this particular period of my life as a bit of an exception.  After all, I was free from my soul eating employer wasn’t I?  No work to go to, lots of time to relax and kick back and guess what…I blew it.

What the F*&%$?!?!? You say.  Yes, I blew it.  I didn’t sleep in everyday, I didn’t read lots of books or catch up on watching movies…instead like a trained slave that was used to the beatings, when the master wasn’t there I flogged myself instead.  My two major mistakes were:

  • I worried the entire time I was unemployed about money.
  • I treated my job search as a job.

The first one was somewhat defensible.  I didn’t have a whole lot of savings at that point in my life and I owned a LOT of money between my wife and I.  After all we had just under $60,000 in debt from university and I signed a $18,000 car lease which was also draining us monthly.  So in fact, if I didn’t get a job when my Unemployment Insurance checks finally stopped coming in I would rapidly go from treading water to screwed in a matter of weeks.  Yes my wife had a job, but given our expenses and limited savings we didn’t have a big cushion (and I wanted to avoid tapping our limited RRSP savings).

Aside: Also when looking back at these months I realized something….this was the genesis moment of my dreams of early retirement even before I found out about the concept.  How? I realize now I never wanted to be in the situation of worry about money like that ever again.  So later on in life when I did come across the idea of early retirement, it was extremely appealing to me.

Yet I do think I worried about this way more than I needed to, which lead me to my second mistake.

I had previously read some well meaning advice on job hunting that you should treat your job search as a job, which being young I assumed meant work on it for like 6 to 8 hours a day.  So I got up each week day and pretend I had a job of finding a job.  So I gave myself a few coffee breaks and a lunch hour but overall spent most of my days looking at job ads and writing up job applications, cover letters and redoing my resume.

Yes, I can see you shaking your head at the stupidity of it because frankly looking back I agree.  I didn’t know that spending more time at something doesn’t always increase the productivity of the activity.  In fact, I could have likely done just as an effective job search in perhaps 2 to 3 hours a day, but I manged to drag out the misery out to six or eight hours a day.  See what I mean by flogging myself.

Then of course because of my worry about running out of money I would feel guilty when I did stop looking early any given day and it would just fall into a negative feedback loop.  I won’t do fun things because of fear of running out of money, feel worse, still not have a job, feel even more guilty and clamp down even harder on our spending.  Fairly sick eh?

Of course I as didn’t realize that engineer jobs looking for 2 to 3 years experience was particularly an endangered species, and I felt I was under qualified for the jobs that were looking for 5 to 7 years experience.  Also keep in mind that after my last job, I was being a hell of lot more picky about getting a new job.  I wanted to avoid oil and gas, which when you live in Alberta cuts out a LOT of jobs.   So this likely went on much longer than it had to.  In the end, what broke me out of this cycle was I decided to widen my job search to pick up just about any decent paying job (ie: higher pay than minimum wage) and I applied for a Customer Service Desk job at a chemical distribution company.

I still actually recall the exact moment I decided I wanted to work at that company.  It happened just before the interview before I knew what the job involved, what it paid or even what the hell was a chemical distribution company.  While I was waiting for the interview of the reception area I watched the staff come up the receptionist and chat with her.  They joked, told stories and smiled a lot more than my previous workplace.  It actually gave me a powerful sense of deja vu to how my immediate family treated each other.

So after two rounds of interviews I was thrilled to be offer a job and finally move out of my self imposed wasteland.

Summary

Lessons Learned

  • Working longer on something doesn’t make it better.
  • Worrying about things you can’t control is rather pointless.
  • Fear of running out of money can be a powerful fear.
  • Learn to have some fun once in a while regardless of your financial situation.  You don’t have to break the bank having a good time.

Financial

  • Progress was non-existent at this point in life.  If anything we went backwards for a few months.

Comments

One Response to “A History of Labour – Part IV”
  1. Steven says:

    Just found your blog and figured I would give it a read. Is there some way to go through it start to finish a bit easier? Using the Archives is a painful click on scroll fest…
    Click Nov 2006, get taken to last article, repeatedly scroll to the bottom of the page and click previous until no longer an option, then read each page from the bottom up, then go back to the bottom to click next.

    Maybe take some tips from MMM ;)

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