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Tuesday, March 28, 2017

A History of Labour – Part III

Posted by Tim Stobbs on February 20, 2015

Welcome to the Oil Patch – Part 2 (Year 2 AD – After Degree)

So in the the spring of 2002 I left my hellhole of a job and moved to the building next door which housed the training division.  I have previously spent a lot of time here getting my initial training and generally liked the majority of the staff.

I was so happy to be out of my old job I didn’t particularly care that the new one was largely editing old Word document and updating screen shots for training manuals. I had just regular day time hours now and I got to see my wife more than just three days a month.

It literally took months for the horror of the previous job to bleed away.  It’s almost interesting to me how much pain I was in because I didn’t fully process how utter crappy my previously job had been until I managed to leave it behind.  I mean I actually saw colours again in the world around me, I could smile again and I actually had some interest in reading and otherwise the fun stuff of life.  And this is despite the fact I was making WAY less money now.

So I happily edited, wrote and merged files all day long without much care that the work I was doing was going to eventually run out.  Yes, this job had a shelf life.  You see in my nativity of youth I didn’t even consider why I got the job in the first place.  After all I was like three seconds away from quitting the company entirely.  From the companies point of view this work out just perfect.  Before the burnt out employee who happens to know the new computer system leaves out the gate to never come back you give him a transfer to another division and suck out all his knowledge and record it onto the new manuals and then you get rid of him.

Actually my boss at this point in time was a nice guy.  I enjoyed chatting with him and I learned a fair bit about training people and writing manuals during this time frame.  He even introduced me to one of my future hobbies of wine making.  He had used to do it and sold me his old equipment for a fraction of the price of retail.  I literally got everything I needed to start for around $100 when the corker itself was worth more than that used.

But being a nice guy doesn’t mean I could stay forever.  I was blissfully ignorant of the fact they brought in a new guy and I started teaching him some of my job duties that it won’t end well for me.  I had been looking for a new job anyway, but I still caught off guard after six months when I was told I was being let go.  Ah ignorance, it’s dulls the pain of waiting for the axe to fall.  They had the decency to at least term it a layoff so I could collect Unemployment Insurance while I continue to look for a new job.

Next up I was tossed into being unemployed.

Summary

Lessons Learned

  • It’s ok to have a rebound job.  Something to fill in the gaps while you look for something better in life.  After all you still have rent and food to buy.
  • You can learn something useful at just about any job.
  • In hindsight I figured out the warning signs of losing your job: you finish your tasks and aren’t assigned more, you started to train someone else on your work, and people start to avoid you like you have a disease (they can sense the pain coming and don’t want to be near you when the axe falls).

Financial Progress

  • Minimal at best.  After being put on just my base salary with no bonus for doing a specific job my amount of take home pay dropped dramatically.  Then with our regular bills and payments there wasn’t much to save.

Comments

2 Responses to “A History of Labour – Part III”
  1. Hilary says:

    However you did have 6 months down time to recover from your burn out while you were being paid. It is really difficult, almost impossible to get to burn out stage, then have to turn around, be upbeat, outgoing and with lots of energy to start another high powered job. Your six months hiatus allowed for recovery time and that is something most of us don’t get.

  2. Tim Stobbs says:

    @Hilary – Very true…I did hugely luck out with this job. The decompress time was well worth it, which is why I suggested there is nothing wrong with having a rebound job.

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