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Thursday, July 31, 2014

How Not to Be Noah

Posted by Tim Stobbs on March 27, 2013

Well if you have been wondering why you haven’t heard much from me lately…I’ve been busy trying to prevent my house from getting flooded.  Flood?!? In Regina?!?

Here is the latest flood forecast for SK, notice the big red dot in the south that says ‘very high.’ In the center of that area is Regina.  So in reality it won’t take much to cause a flood here after all we did break a record for snowfall this year with over six feet of the white stuff (snow, not the other white stuff).  So right now there is a whole lot of people trying to move snow away from our house foundations and praying for a slow melt and little rain for the next month or so.

Moving snow and chipping ice of my roof trying to prevent ice dams has largely where I’ve been spending my free time for the last week or so.  Why the sudden rush?  It’s been driven by the forecast, with Easter is just around the corner so is the first longer period of positive high temperatures for daytime highs.  Yes, I’ve spent most of March in freezing temperatures, and yes it sucked (moving on before I rant).

As you can imagine with six feet of snow I have some impressive banks of snow around my house that I’m trying to move away from the foundation is well interesting.  After all the snow piles everywhere in my yard are huge, so moving the snow really means breaking up the ice layers in the snow then shoveling the snow into areas which should drain better.  It’s also like a geology lesson on our storms during the last winter as the snow has four or five layers to it with different density and hardness. Ironically the easy stuff to shovel is at the bottom.

But don’t you have insurance in the event your basement does flood?  Well yes, but just because I have insurance for my house in case it burns to the ground doesn’t mean I want to set my house on fire to actually use it!  I rather put in some time now in prevention than deal with a bigger mess down the road.  After all, to remind me of this fact our neighbour had a burst pipe this winter and came back from vacation with 10 inches of water in their basement.  Ick, what a mess.

So have you ever had to use your insurance for a big clean up?  What was the cause and would you did you do to prevent it?

Comments

6 Responses to “How Not to Be Noah”
  1. Daryl says:

    I feel for you.

    Follow those rivers to the east a little and then you find my house. The Manitoba flood forcast came out yesterday and as you can probably guess, it doesn’t look great either. I just hope we don’t have a repeat of 2011 where the Assiniboine and Souris rivers turned into 1 in 300 year raging flood channels.

  2. Katie says:

    I don’t envy you!

    As for insurance – yes, it’s very nice to have, but if one’s house is flooded, insurance or not, there’s a hell of a mess to clean up (and if you have insurance, there’s adjusters to deal with as well!) Avoidance where possible, and mitigation where avoidance isn’t possible, is the best insurance :-)

  3. Susan says:

    Just prevented a housefire two days ago. A computer adapter cord just burst into flames. I heard a popping/crackling noise from the kitchen that alerted me. My first thought was to unplug it but I used the fire extinguisher to put out the flames instead (I guess I feared being electrocuted) and then called the fire department.

    The fireman said that I could have unplugged it or turned off the main electrical breaker but in the heat of the moment my heart was racing and I just grabbed the extinguisher. It did make a mess that took most of the day to clean up but when I think of what could have happened I was happy for the inconvenience. Luckily my computer itself wasn’t damaged – I just had to clean out the extinguisher powdered chemical with a can of compressed air as suggested by one of the firemen.

    Could this have been prevented? Maybe. I was using a cord that my husband had bought online – it may have been a used or refurbished cord so I guess I’d say buyer beware. As a precaution I no longer leave the adapter plugged in unless I’m in the house and I unplug it from the wall before going to bed at night. So yes, I would say prevention can spare a whole lot of heartache/headaches.

  4. Tim Stobbs says:

    Thanks everyone…hopefully we should be fine. I’m almost done moving the snow, which I hope to finish today.

    @Susan – It’s hard to say if you could have prevented that. Faulty equipment is hard to predict even if it had been new. Accidents do happen, but I always power off our adapter when I’m not using the computer…why not save the power anyway.

  5. I hope your efforts prevent you from experiencing any of the flooding

    Much of the town I live in is built on a floodplain. And we’ve got a lot of snow this year as well. Expecting some areas of town to be closed off in the next week or two, the river’s already running way high.

    Thankfully our house is just high enough that we don’t ever expect to get flooding. For the folks in town here that see it regularly, they do take some steps to mitigate. Furnaces aren’t built at ground level, they’ll basically be mounted on the ceiling.

    It’s catastrophic for those that do get flooded. The last flood we had, water was pouring in through basement windows, water was geysering up out of basement floors. All very devasting for the families involved. One lady didn’t have insurance coverage, it basically meant she lost her house, couldn’t afford to fix it, couldn’t sell it damaged. I spoke to another lady who couldn’t get out of her house to attend her husband’s funeral. Someone had to go get a boat and guide her off her front porch to get her to the funeral home. It’s stuff like that that makes me see that flooding isn’t just an insurance issue, it’s a real upsetting thing for families to go through.
    .

  6. A says:

    yes, used condo insurance to cover cost of water being turned on while plumber was switching valves in the kitchen. what would I do to prevent this? not move into a condo.

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